Ruby Sanctum Gear for Holy Paladins

 

MMO-Champion has released the gear for the PTR tested Ruby Sanctum. The whole list is very slim, with 13 pieces dropping from 25-man and 6 pieces dropping from 10-man, but we’ve gotten love from Blizzard in these pieces. Every healing piece that drops would be a nice choice for a Holy Paladin looking for upgrades before heroic ICC (Although your other healers will most likely hunt you down if you try to take their leather/cloth/mail armor from them). In the interest of people who don’t want spoilers about the gear I’m going to put the list (and my comments on them) after a break!

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Filed under Raids, Soap box

How to: Apply to the Guild of your Dreams!

When you’re looking for a raiding guild to satisfy your raiding needs you’ll often find that you are required to fill out an application, or app for short. DO NOT PANIC. I am here to help you with some simple guide lines for what not to do when applying to a guild you hope will want to take you in and feed you, and love you, and hug you until the end of your raiding days!

Tip #1– Write in chatspeak for faster reading

All recruiters need to get through your application quickly so they can get on to do more important things. Speaking in chatspeak, or L33t can help them accomplish their task much more quickly. They’ll be so thankful that you’re sure to get many wonderful follow-up questions asking you to go into more detail about your answers! Often people will respond with things like “Please explain?” or “I don’t understand what your answer is!” This is a natural response that people trying to find out more about your wonderful personality and raiding skills. After you explain (again using chatspeak so they can absorb your answers more quickly) will often use to apologize for their own lack of knowledge and try to gain understanding of how a well-educated raider, like yourself, feels about their own class and skill set. Don’t be perturbed by comments such as “Your application is poorly written, and it looks like you took 20 seconds to fill it out.” This is an example of the a member of the unwashed masses responding to the inferior knowledge he or she has about anything to do with raiding. Disregard everything these people say– they are haters who don’t appreciate real talent (like yourself) and need 2 l2play nub.

Tip #2– Minimal details make you mysterious!

Mystery is the spark of life in any relationship, and that’s what you’re trying to build with your future guildmates during the application process. If you let them know all of the other experiences you’ve had with different raid groups, and what kind of gear you’re wearing under that tabard, what more is there to learn about you? Who wants to raid with someone who has spilled their life story on the first application? Better hold of until the third or fourth raid to mention that time you went to ToGC with your buddies and Gormock got a little crazy with the enrage timer. And don’t even think about posting a WOL or WWS report– TMI buddy, TMI! If you’re going to give it up that easy what kind of relationship are you going to be able to build. No, telling people things like that will ensure you only get called in when they’re lonely on a monday night and just need a little fun. You don’t want to be the raid booty call, do you?

Tip #3– Bashing your former guild shows you know how to give criticism!

Obviously, you’re leaving your former guild for reasons that were entirely their fault. How better to show that you can recognize who the best is than telling your future guildies each and every one of your former guilds faults? Things like “they seriously suck dick and don’t know shit,” and “The raid leader is a nub who needs to l2p and stfu!1!” show your dedication to success and that you don’t tolerate poor performance from anyone, including yourself!

—————-

Alright, I’m sure you all know these are things not to do on an application. Applying to a guild is like applying for a job– you need to impress the people you want to take you into raids. An application is their first look at you. How can they know you’re actually a great healer if all of your answers are either illegible or contain very little detail about your experience? Forcing the recruiters to dig into your armory or various other sites used to find out the minimal information about you may defer them from even looking into your background. By spending time on your application you give the same impression as someone showing up in a suit– you’re prepared, know what you’re talking about, and you’ll be an improvement to their team, rather than a detriment. In putting the minimal effort into your application is the equivalent of showing up in ripped up jeans and a “Who farted?” baseball cap to an interview for your dream job. Or in other words– L2play nub!

The first time I wrote out an application for a raiding spot it was for my current guild. Knowing what irked me from looking over applications for Surge, I was nervous to present myself to someone who would over look all the details of my application, check their truthfulness where possible, and basically judge my personality to see if it would fit with their current guild. Not to mention if my class was even needed. It can be a very nerve-wracking experience for anyone involved.

Now-a-days I spend a good chunk of time looking over new applicants for Prototype. Sometimes the applications are wonderful, eloquent, and other times…well other times you just want to ask the person “What were you thinking?!” What’s the best advice I can give you when you’re applying to a guild?

1. Understand what you’re applying for

You don’t want to apply to a guild that’s working on the normal Plagueworks when you really want to be doing hardmodes. Nor do you want to apply to a 25 man guild when you’re happier in a ten man raid. Do the research for the guild, and you’ll find a home you’ll love rather than a place you will be uncomfortable in.

2. Research a question if you don’t understand it

The number of times I see “I don’t know how to take a screen shot D,:” or “What is WOL?” on an application is kind of baffling. There are a number of resources literally at your fingertips to discover what something means, or how to do something that is required for the application. Google, the WoW forums, the thousands of WoW websites out their all have the information you’re looking for. If your application requires a parse (a.k.a. world of logs or one of the other programs out there that record data during raids like healing, deaths, activity, DPS, etc.) and you don’t have one available you have two options. Either explain that you don’t have one, or go to the WoL website and install their program to record your own parse the next time you’re in a raid, even a pug group. The option I would choose is number two. Not only does it show what you’re capable of in a raid, it also gives you the opportunity to look through the log and see what you can improve on before you hit the “submit” button on your app.

3. Type in a program that has spellcheck

It helps tremendously if the readers can understand what you’re saying. When I wrote out my application I copy/pasted the form into a Word document and answered the questions that required explanations on that page so I could ensure that my grammar and spelling were correct. Even your email has spellcheck abilities, so type in there if you don’t have a word program.

4. Always give the most truthful answer

No matter what kind of experience your previous guild has, if you haven’t accompanied them on all of fights you don’t have that experience. People will know that you’re lying as soon as they open up your achievement tab in armory, and a lie generally means an automatic “no”, no matter how great your gear is. Even if your experience is limited it is better to tell them simply what it is, and how you plan to improve instead of fibbing or not even mentioning what you have accomplished.

5. The answer to “What can you improve on?” is never “Nothing!”

This is a fairly open-ended, tricky question. You don’t want to list to many things and enumerate every fault you have. However, saying “Nothing” makes you look cocky, and paints you as a potential problem when criticism time comes around. My answer to this question was my PvP skills–now hold on, I know PvE isn’t always impacted by PvP, but let me explain. Personally, I believe that a healer who can keep up in the frantic pace of a PvP enviroment is going to be exponentially better than a healer who just does PvE, because they will have faster reaction times, and know the skills of their class better. The best thing you can do is be honest; if you feel you need to improve on researching fights say so, or if you need to work on understanding other classes abilities, or any number of possibilities, explain as honestly as you can, giving a short response to fill in the “why.” When I read a response where the person actually puts some thought into how they can improve it shows much more potential than any amount of experience, and bodes well for them making improvements for the betterment of our raid group.

6. Bashing your former guild does not make a good impression

Joking aside, ranting about your former guild in an application is the equivalent of whining about your ex-boyfriend to every guy you meet at a bar: you come off as petty and a drama queen, and no body wants to touch you with a ten foot pool. Stay away from inflammatory statements like “They suck” or words will negative connotations. No matter how justified you feel you are in your comments, does anyone really need to know that your former guildleader “sucks eggs?” It comes off as immature, and people reading it will doubtless wonder how you got yourself into such a hostile situation. Personally, anyone yelling about how their former guild is “teh sux” gets an automatic pass from me; too much drama incoming to be worth any amount of skill.

Honestly, most of these things are common sense. Keep them in mind, and although I can’t guarantee you a spot in the guild you want, you’ll have a good chance of finding a place that makes you happy!

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My eye balls, they bleed, but it’s for Glory!

As you’ll notice the site has had a make-over! I actually drew the image you see above you, but I couldn’t use all of it to my dismay. Here’s the original drawing:

I was taking pictures of this with my laptop light shining on it (Yes, my scanner isn’t hooked up, I am a failure artist!) so that’s where the funky blue light comes from. As you can see I’m wearing my beloved T10 helm, and either I’m on fire or I’m healing, I haven’t decided yet. The quill was a last-minute addition, and I’m sad I couldn’t fit it in the final version. Maybe I’ll find something to use it for later!

I’ve been having a lovely argument with my eyeballs for the last few hours while I changed exposure and contrast on this little web program that is not photoshop. Not that it would matter, because I don’t technically know how to use photoshop, but the options would have been nice. Well, it’s not like I could have actually seen the options, because my eyes were, and continue to rebel. I look like a mentally challenged fish as I’m closing one eye at a time and rubbing it while I use the other one to see what I’m typing.

Actually, I just discovered I can type with my eyes closed, so I only look like a dying fish. At least I can still wirte lebbiled snetnances, adn no spllchek neeedd!1!

I’m going to type with my eyes open for this part, because I feel I owe a bit of an apology to anyone who has been holding their breath waiting for my next post (Which, if you’re doing, you may want to seek medical attention because not only have you been refraining from breathing for a while, you’re also doing it on my account, which is unhealthy on so many levels.) I’d like to be able to say I’ve been marooned on a desert island without Wi-Fi, or that I was recently transformed into a rabbit during a Magic show accident, but sadly I’ve just been neglecting my blogging duty. However, mayhem has run amuck in my WoW life, and I’ve made a change that will be effecting what I’ll be blogging about.

 I moved off Trollbane and onto Stormrage with my guild The Forgotten, now known as Prototype. I won’t go into the myriad of details why I left TB, but the general reasons were that A) All of the “top” 25 man guilds had server transferred and if I didn’t go to Stormrage or somewhere else I’d have to end my progression raiding career then and there, B) The friends I had previously decided to stay on TB and raid with have gradually stopped playing, or at least raiding, to my eternal sadness, and C) I needed to, as one lovely commenter put it, get my “raiding mojo” back, and a new setting has already started helping me to do that

 For now I’d like to move away from talking about guild stuff and get back to discussing things that are more interesting than guild drama!

Boyfriend is out-of-town until Wednesday, I’m done with my freshman year of college, and I have spent all the money I’m allowed to without feeling completely guilty on M:TG cards, so I’ll have nothing to do but draw and write for the next few days!

…holy crap, I’m done with my first year of college.

What?!

But…that means…I’m actually an adult? I’ve lived away from my family for an entire school year, and I’ve managed not to explode, or end up in a mental hospital?

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Filed under >:O, Guild life, MS Pain Graphics department, My life, Yum

Where I yell a lot about Finals and serve you Pie

Ah, finals week! My favorite time of the semester. Where I get to feel guilty about not blogging, guilty about only logging on for raid, yell at the boyfriend for silly things, and not clean the house.

Oh, and stay up until ungodly hours of the night glueing paper to paper. Thats right, I said it. GLUEING PAPER TO FUCKING PAPER. Poster board projects are not my favorite, especially when my printer breaks and all my pretty fossil pictures have to get printed in the library in black and white, which clashes horribly with the colorful paper I glued to other pieces of paper until 3 am!

>:O

Well, now that I’m done yelling about that…Anyways. There is so much I have floating around in my brain for ideas for posts, and until I have time to write them all down and make them presentable, I will give you the quick and dirty of things to come.

Haste, and why I love it.

Kingslayer 25 man, complete!

Site design changes, or how WordPress is infinitely more infuriating than glueing paper to paper.

Not talking about Cataclysm raid changes*

Not talking about Cataclysm class changes*

What I want from Cataclysm.

Healer weapon options from ICC.

Of course, knowing  how I do things, I’m sure I’ll never actually get around to making those posts and be a lazy cow as soon as finals are over. Well, it’s the thought that counts, right? However, I want to give you my reasons for not blogging about the cataclysm changes, and I shall do so in Pie chart form! Enjoy until after finals when I get down to some real blogging again, heh.

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Filed under >:O, MS Pain Graphics department, My life, OMFG Finals!!, yum pie

Pheadra begins casting Slime Spray!

Ever get that feeling that you’re going to projectile vomit, Rotface style, all over your laptop because you’re so nervous about a raid?

Yeah, well that was me all tonight.

Over the last week, all of our former guild mates from Surge trickled in applications to the best alliance raiding guild on server. It was a strange thing. I’d check the forums and be like “Oh there’s Ominous’s app…and Winters….” [one day later] “Hmmm, Mcginnis applied too.” And so on, and so forth. In a stroke of generosity the Raid leader decided that if he was going to take one of us, he was going to take all of us. He mentioned that we had to fight for raid spots like everyone else, and that we all knew how to fill out an application damn well (Heh, freaking out about poor apps seems to have made an impression on my guild mates), but we’d be in for raids to show we knew what we were doing. We’re playin’ with the big boys now.

The skill level difference is astounding. It’s a bit of a culture shock when your top DPS is suddenly 10th or 11th on meters. There is a reason these players are the best: They don’t put up with shit, and expect you to know what you’re doing before they have to tell you. You’re there on time, or you don’t raid. When forty people are online, there is no “holding a spot.” You better prove you’re worth your raid slot, or you’re not going to raid. So far only three of us have had a chance to show what we’re worth: Myself, a Hunter, and my Druid boyfriend. All of us will get our chance to show what we’re worth, but being better than their current players is going to take a great deal of work.

We went in Tuesday and did Heroic Marrowgar, and Regular Deathwhisper. In typical nervous fashion I managed to overheal like a madman and forget to take the teleporter back to Lady D after a wipe. /facepalm. Then I managed to suffer from a severe case of foot-in-mouth syndrome when I starting being nosy about why the other Holy paladin in the raid wanted Heroic Trauma.

Okay, self. Just because the majority of Holy paladins you’ve run with are complete idiots does not mean you’re queen of the knowledge sphere. He can afford to sacrifice a few points of int and haste because his other gear is awesome (unlike yours, you haste whore) for that chunk of spellpower, and he can do whatever he damn well pleases with that proc. Now stfu and gtfo of your bossy, almighty mood.

I apologized tonight, and I really didn’t mean to offend him. I can be a bit…over enthusiastic…about talking with other people who know what they’re doing, because it’s so rare that I can find someone who does the kind of research I do. Evidence: 

  • 2nd day in guild- noisily asks why in the world a holy paladin would want that proc over a druid or a shaman. Begin offense. 
  • 3rd day in guild - In debate with off spec holy paladin about FoL spec vs HL (thank you Codi for supplying the math to my reasoning), who’s probably been playing MMOs since before I had internet. Thank god he enjoyed the conversation, and the ensuing competition (which we never really got to test, which is a shame), or I’d be pissing off people left and right it seems.

We called raid on Tuesday two hours early because of the horrible server lag on Gunship and Saurfang. Eight second casts are no fun. Tonight we started at Heroic Saurfang again. We used a rotation of three holy paladins to control the first four marks and tanks, then the priests picked up any extra. My job was to beacon the fourth mark to come out, and keep healing the tanks. Well, lo and behold, guess who blows all her mana trying to raid heal, and when her mark comes out promptly goes oom?

That’s right, this girl.

So as I abandon everything I have ever learned about efficent healing, the mage dies, Deathbringer hops back up to 50%, and we wipe it. UGH. Okay, so just FoL from now on, lightly, let the raid healers cover the damage until all the other paladins are keeping marks up. I manage to stay at relatively full mana until my mark comes out, but, between when my holy lights are landing from my beacon one of the other paladins gets nervous about my target (probably not thinking “OMG Pheadra sucks, must heal before she wipes us,” or at least I hope that’s not what he was thinking) and tries to shock him, and another mark dies. So we wipe it, we run back. Rinse and repeat for the next hour and a half. It was so many things, either a mark would get blood boiled and die from sheer amount of damage, or a tank wouldn’t get a CD off fast enough, or any number of things that caused us to wipe. This hardmode is hard. And I hate warrior tanks spiky damage intake. One moment everything is peachy, the next *BOOMMUTHAFUCKA* says Saurfang, and he’s promptly dead. Give me a prot paladin and feral druid any day.

/sigh

Let the anxious  healer nausea begin. 

I’m putting the pressure on myself not only to perform at my highest level, but because it’s something else to be in a guild based on my merit, not because I was immediately branded with the “girlfriend” label and people assumed I would need to be carried through raids, or that I was a social player. Trust me, I’ve never coasted on that idea through raiding; I’ve proven I’m a good healer in every guild I’ve been in. It just so happens that Punch usually gets in the guild first, or says “Oh, but I’ll only come if my girlfriend can come too.” Example: when I came into Surge they immediately moved me to “non-raider” status, and I had to explain that I was here to raid, not to be a social player. Very frustrating.

I’ve got a lot to prove here, not only for myself, but I feel like for the former members of Surge. I can imagine that it’s easy for all the “old hats” to believe that we’re all really terrible (or at the minimum at least not at their level), and we’re going to take raid spots and gear until it becomes obvious we’re all not good enough for HMs and we should be regulated to alt 25 man runs. Seeing the level of performance, I don’t doubt that some people don’t deserve that main raid spot. However, some of us can perform at that level, and it will be exciting/nauseating to get that chance.

My main goal in the next few weeks is to gain the trust of the other healers. Almost nothing can be more detrimental to a healing team than trust issues. It causes you to stretch yourself thin worrying about assignments that aren’t yours, and all that added stress isn’t good for a raider. There’s a reason that we can’t one heal everything, so I’m not even going to try. I’m definitely guilty of throwing out extra heals to other players when I see their health dropping, but that mainly becomes overhealing anyway, and does nothing for my mana conservation, which leads to my own assignments dying. Hopefully we’ll be singing campfire songs and holding hands in no time. Okay, no, that’d be weird. But at least they’ll know I can keep a target alive. Or, at least, I hope that’s something that proves to be true.

Oh, and on a side note, when we were in vent discussing about joining, one of the holy paladins mentioned that he read my blog.

OMGWTFBBQ.

EMBARESSEDNERDSPAZZ.

…you mean other people who don’t blog read this?! It’s not just some weird person in their basement refreshing my page for some strange reason? I guess it’s just coming face-to-face (or voice-to-voice) with someone who I don’t know, who doesn’t blog who has read some of my stuff that’s tweaking me out. Not in a bad way, just…well, let’s go back to that anxious nausea reason.

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Filed under Guild life, Progression

This is the way a guild ends, not with a bang but a…server transfer?

I’m hysterically laughing while I write this post. Why? Because I’ve just realized that the Run Back Series I put on hold many moons ago is now the perfect set of articles I’m going to write over the next few weeks. “But, Pheadra,” you may ask me, “Arn’t you in a 25 man guild? Arn’t you recruitment leader and guild assist of Surge?” Well darlings, there are simple answers to those very good questions.

1.No

2.Yes

For all intents and purposes Surge has ceased to exist as a 25 man guild as of last night.

Before going into ICC 25 last night, our GM gave the rest of the guild the news that I had known for a few days: He, several of our officers, and a few members were going to server transfer off of Trollbane. He had a guild lined up for himself, and he would speak to the GMs there if anyone else wanted to go with him. He gave a very typical longwinded speech, and gave us the reasons for leaving, chiefly of which was that he didn’t feel Trollbane was a server worth its salt for progression raiders, and that we would all be able to succeed as a guild on Stormrage. I’ve already shared my reasons for not wanting to server transfer at the moment (it’s not a completely eliminated possibility for further down the road), and some other people felt the same. The GM was leaving the guild, with bank, intact for anyone who wanted to continue raiding in it after tonight, and there was some money available if the officers who were staying wanted to create their own guild. Of course, this caught a large portion of people off guard. Questions abounded, and a few people made snap decisions if they were leaving or not.

Honestly, I am green with envy of everyone who has a stable guild and/or raiding environment. I was sorely tempted to apply to the top Alliance guild on TB and try to get as many of my friends to app with me so we could continue raiding 25s together in a progressing environment. I was not interested in trying to rebuild for the third time in my fairly short raiding career. It is hard, so hard, to rebuild on a server like Trollbane. That is one point I agree with my ex-GM on– the proportion of casual raiders is vastly larger than the “hard-core” raiders we want to be. It’s hard, but not impossible.

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Ye old code of Ventralry

Since Ventrillio is a nessicity of progression raiding I figured there must be some code of conduct I can pass around to my blog readers! All social situations have unwritten codes of conduct everyone should follow (or mostly unwritten, sororities tend to write theirs down). Luckily I found this gem while digging through my collection of medieval raiding paraphernalia (You think they conquered each other without use of a voice program? Ha, newb.):

I) Ye shall not bombard ye fellows with thy political, nor religious, beliefs

2) Thy voice shall not decibly offend ye comrade eardrums

3) Nor shall thy voice be unintelligible to all but the most sensitive microphones

4) Ye shall not be a bully to any guildie of ours

5) If thy is not the Commander, than thy shall shut thy face pertaining to the slaying of beasts

6) Ye shall mute upon thine own peril

 

Wow, such a brilliant and polite mind to have committed to words the traditionally accepted Vent  procedures. Now, we can all bask in their glorious use of medieval “thys” and wonder at our own vile rudeness if we should break these most sacred of oaths. Since many of you may not be familiar with medieval speak, I’ll clue you in on the meanings of these rules of ventrillio.

1) Just like you wouldn’t want to be yelled at for your sexuality, skin tone, or sex, many people do not want to have to defend their political views in an open vent channel in the middle of a raid. Not only are politics and religion harshly debated topics that get peoples blood pumping, but most importantly WoW is a source of entertainment people play to get away from the stresses of day-to-day occurences. Politics and religion are intensely personal, and attacking someone for what they believe is one surefire way to create an unpleasant raid environment, and possibly receive a /gkick in the deal.

2)Yelling into a microphone not only hurts peoples ears, it gets real annoyingg real fast. People can always turn you down, but that puts you at risk for normal volume comments not being heard because your volume is adjusted for you being super loud that normal volume suggestion that could have saved the raid from a wipe won’t be heard. Also, don’t sneeze with your vent on either (I’ve done that one before…) If you’re not actually yelling but it seems like it to the people clutching their ears and trying to stem the bleeding, try turning your outbound down. Sometimes laptop mics can be extra sensitive and very loud.

3) If you’re whispering into vent I can only think of a few reasons that would be nessicary: a) Your house has been invaded by zombies that can’t hear whispers, so you can finish your guilds HM Lich King kill if you’re really, really quiet…But in that case you probably should go find a shot gun and run! or b) You’re a kiddie and your parents will ground you if they hear you on vent at 11 PM…but, again, in that case you probably shouldn’t be online so late, and did you do your homework? Anyway, the point is, you’re not saying sweet nothings to your lover, and I doubt anyone if your raid wants to hear you say breathily “I’ve got an ooze on me, come get it off.”

4) Bullying, like trolling, isn’t useful at all. It goes back to the whole cohesive raid thing– upset people make unhappy raiders, unhappy raiders make for poor progression nights, poor progression nights breeds resentment, and resentment leads to angry healer channels (or DPS, or Tank) and poor attendance. Especially if you’re bullying over vent; you’re throwing them into the fire in front of everyone, and you’re going to upset their friends as well as them. Also, not only does being a bully show that you’ve got some serious team-work issues, but it’s a form of criticism that doesn’t get taken constructively. What would you rather hear: “God, [x], you must be sitting there with your thumb in your butt instead of healing because you’re fucking sucking tonight”  or “Hey, [x], I’ve noticed you’re having some issues tonight, are you having an issue with the mechanics of the fight?” Most people won’t resent an honest question; it gives them an opportunity to explain why their heals/dps/survivability is lower in this fight, and to ask any questions.

5) A clear vent channel is helpful when working on progression. Everyone is sure that the only ones giving direction are those in charge: class leaders, or just raid leaders. When the call for heroism on Saurfang comes from BillyBob Jenkins 15% to early instead of Raid Leader Nelson people get confused and then heroism gets blown because the shaman are always jumpy about it (We have a policy where no one but the raid leader even mentions the “H” word because even a question about it always results in it being blown). If you have ideas, mention them after a fight. The ability to guide the unwashed masses is give to the raid leaders because they’re experienced, people respect them (hopefully), and they know what they’re doing. When every Tom, Dick, and Harry are all yelling differnt things over top of the raid leader angry wipes are sure to ensue.

6) Muting is something I am uncomfortable with, because I’m afraid I’ll miss something important. The esteemed person who wrote these rules obviously felt that way to. They’re a guild mate, you’re  supposed to respect them, and receive respect in turn. However, if you’ve got to mute someone for legit reasons they are probably breaking any, or many, of the aforementioned vent guidlines.

What a crazy useful thing to find in my random collection of medieval raiding artifacts (What don’t believe me? Type “medieval artifacts” in google and the first one you see is mine)! Maybe it will save us all some grief in the future, because the people who repeatedly ignore these guidelines and the guilde lines of social acceptability are probably going to cause a great deal of problems in the future.

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